Real Woman Real Journey (RWRJ)   

     

 Women's Wellness Resources -

Resources pour la Santé des Femmes

Self Care

Engaging in self-care means to create the time and take the actions required to care for all of your personal wellness needs.

If you are seeking support with a life transition or "letting go", browse counsellors in your province who are ready to assist you.

Knowing When to Let Go

By Shatyra Williams, MSW, RSW

Published: March 2014

Letting go of a relationship, position, or long term commitment is often one of the hardest things for people to do. Even when we know deep inside that this person, place, or practice is no longer best for us, it is sometimes easier to cope with the consequences of staying rather than summon the strength to leave.

 

Some of the key factors that indicate it is time for you to move on with your life are as follows:

 

  1. You have been unhappy over a long period of time
  2. You have made serious attempts to make things better with no success
  3. You feel that you are not growing, expanding, or evolving as a person
  4. Your instincts tell you things aren't right
  5. Your closest confidants tell you things don't seem right
  6. Your current situation is blocking you from achieving personal goals
  7. Your current situation is consuming an unwarranted amount of your energy or emotions
  8. You can envision yourself healthier and happier in a new environment

 

Take life’s clues seriously. If your job has not made you happy for the last ten years, then recognize that it is likely to give you the same level of fulfillment for the following ten years to come. If a relationship has caused you heartache after many attempts to repair the breakdown, if you have tried counselling, mediation, and giving each other space to think – with no success, then accept that a separation may be appropriate. If an unhealthy habit has left you feeling sick, financially unstable, or alone year after year, then zone in on that habit and clear it out of your life.


Letting go is definitely easier said than done but letting precious years of your life go by right before your eyes is also easily done. Each situation is unique and requires its own evaluation and decision. When making your decision of whether or not to separate from a person, place, or situation, keep in mind that fear should not be a primary reason to avoid separation. Guilt should not be a primary reason to avoid separation. Comfort should not be a primary reason to avoid separation, and pressure from others should not be a primary reason to avoid separation.


Whatever you decide, make sure it is your decision and is based on your true belief that your overall wellness will benefit from this decision.

About the Author

Shatyra Williams MSW, RSW is a Toronto-based Social Worker with a passion for women's wellness. As Program Manager of RWRJ's Artistic Healing Group, Shatyra teaches healthy coping strategies for women survivors of trauma. Through a variety of creative educational techniques Shatyra helps women to challenge themselves, to embrace their imperfections, and to love their journey. 

Return to Articles Page